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<p>The research group &ldquo;Acoustic and Functional Ecology&rdquo; of Dr. Holger R. Goerlitz has started on March 1<sup>st</sup>, funded by a 5 year Emmy Noether award of the German Research Foundation (DFG). The group&rsquo;s research focuses on the mechanisms, ecology and evolution of sensory perception and auditory-guided behaviour, using echolocating bats and eared moths as a model system of auditory interacting predators and prey.</p>

New Research Group in Seewiesen

The research group “Acoustic and Functional Ecology” of Dr. Holger R. Goerlitz has started on March 1st, funded by a 5 year Emmy Noether award of the German Research Foundation (DFG). The group’s research focuses on the mechanisms, ecology and evolution of sensory perception and auditory-guided behaviour, using echolocating bats and eared moths as a model system of auditory interacting predators and prey.

[more]
Researchers from the Sensory Ecology Group showed that greater mouse-eared bats can learn from each other. Information transfer was enhanced when the animals could directly interact with their demonstrators and the newly aquired information could be retained for one year in the wild. Also lesser mouse-eared bats were able to learn socially from their greater relatives.

Social learning and information transfer in mouse-eared bats

Researchers from the Sensory Ecology Group showed that greater mouse-eared bats can learn from each other. Information transfer was enhanced when the animals could directly interact with their demonstrators and the newly aquired information could be retained for one year in the wild. Also lesser mouse-eared bats were able to learn socially from their greater relatives. [more]
Gorillas are more likely to adopt new skills (i) when having skilled mothers as role models and (ii) when these skills have a direct benefit, a new study in&nbsp;<em>PLOS ONE</em>&nbsp;reveals. The two researchers of the Humboldt Group at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology investigated whether and how two distinct behaviors, a food processing technique and a communicative display, spread in a community of gorillas in captivity during a ten-year period. Photo: Simone Pika

Gorilla mothers also matter

Gorillas are more likely to adopt new skills (i) when having skilled mothers as role models and (ii) when these skills have a direct benefit, a new study in PLOS ONE reveals. The two researchers of the Humboldt Group at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology investigated whether and how two distinct behaviors, a food processing technique and a communicative display, spread in a community of gorillas in captivity during a ten-year period. Photo: Simone Pika
Homing pigeons, like other birds, are extraordinary navigators, but how they manage to find their way back to their lofts is still debated. To navigate, birds require a "map" (to tell them home is south, for example) and a "compass" (to tell them where south is), with the sun and the Earth&rsquo;s magnetic field being the preferred compass systems. A new paper by Hans Wallraff provides evidence that the information pigeons use as a map is in fact available in the atmosphere: odours and winds allow them to find their way home. The results are now published in Biogeosciences, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (<span class="caps">EGU</span>).

How pigeons may smell their way home

Homing pigeons, like other birds, are extraordinary navigators, but how they manage to find their way back to their lofts is still debated. To navigate, birds require a "map" (to tell them home is south, for example) and a "compass" (to tell them where south is), with the sun and the Earth’s magnetic field being the preferred compass systems. A new paper by Hans Wallraff provides evidence that the information pigeons use as a map is in fact available in the atmosphere: odours and winds allow them to find their way home. The results are now published in Biogeosciences, an open access journal of the European Geosciences Union (EGU). [more]
Paul Kuchenbuch and Marlen Fr&ouml;hlich of the Humboldt Research Group for Comparative Gestural Signalling received support for their field work on the Bonobo field station Lui Kotal in the Democratic Republic of Congo and the field station Kanyawara in Kibale National Parc, Uganda. Paul got a Leakey- and a Wenner-Gren Grant, Marlen was also awarded by a Wenner-Gren Grant. Congratulations for this success!

Two IMPRS students awarded

Paul Kuchenbuch and Marlen Fröhlich of the Humboldt Research Group for Comparative Gestural Signalling received support for their field work on the Bonobo field station Lui Kotal in the Democratic Republic of Congo and the field station Kanyawara in Kibale National Parc, Uganda. Paul got a Leakey- and a Wenner-Gren Grant, Marlen was also awarded by a Wenner-Gren Grant. Congratulations for this success!
 
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