Frontiers in Behavioural Research

Frontiers in Behavioural Research

Symposium in Seewiesen
April 4 and 5, 2019
Seminar Room House 4

We are pleased to invite you to our Symposium Frontiers in Behavioural Research on the 4th and 5th of April 2019 at the Max Planck Institute for Ornithology in Seewiesen.
We welcome renowned scientists from institutions worldwide. Their keynote talks will provide insights into different aspects of behavioural research and give an outlook for the future of this field.

Invited speakers

Susanne Åkesson is professor at the University of Lund and studies movement ecology of birds and other animals, especially the phenotypic characteristics of endogenous migration programs and how animals have adapted to cope with long migrations. Besides that, she has a strong interest in research questions connecting biology and physics, more precisely in sensory ecology, leading to several studies on the navigation of Vikings and animals, and the evolution of zebra coat coloration. more
Renée A. Duckworth from the University of Arizona focusses her research on the understanding of the evolution and origin of ecologically important traits by linking large scale ecological patterns to individual variation in behaviour, morphology and physiology. She is spanning a spectrum of scales in biology to link the molecular, physiological and developmental basis of behavioural variation with population dynamics and community formation. more
Barbara Helm is professor for Biological Rhythms of Natural Organisms at the University of Groningen. Her research is inspired by a paired passion for ornithology and chronobiology. Her study of avian behaviour from a perspective of timing is integrating experimental settings, where endogenous components can be isolated, and the study of animals in their complex, natural environments. more
Miriam Liedvogel is head of the Max Planck Research Group Behavioural Genomics at the Max Planck Institute for Evolutionary Biology. Her research focuses on the genetic basis of bird migration, and whether signalling pathways are associated with variation of the migratory phenotype. She combines next generation sequencing techniques with behavioural observations in a well-characterised study system. more
Jane M. Reid is professor at the University of Aberdeen. The aim of her research is to understand the genetic and environmental causes of variation in individual life-histories, and to understand the consequences of such variation for population and evolutionary dynamics. At present, she focusses her research on mating system evolution and eco-evolutionary dynamics driven by seasonal migration. more
Christian Rutz is professor at the University of St Andrews. He has diverse research interests in the fields of animal ecology (behavioural ecology; population biology; predation dynamics), animal cognition (tool use; culture; social learning; comparative cognition), and conservation science (large-scale conservation schemes; policy making). The principal research project of his group is on the evolutionary, ecological and social contexts of tool-use behaviour in New Caledonian crows. more
Claire Spottiswoode works at the University of Cambridge and the University of Cape Town. She is interested in the evolution, ecology and conservation of species interactions, mainly on African birds. Besides asking how coevolution can escalate into ongoing arms races involving defensive egg signatures in hosts and mimetic forgeries in parasites, she also incorporates genetic approaches to find out how host-specificity can evolve within parasitic species that exploit multiple hosts. more
Mary Caswell Stoddard is Assistant Professor at Princeton University. Her research program explores the evolution of animal vision, coloration and morphology. She combines  experiments in the lab and fieldwork with studies based on
museum collections for her projects on animal coloration and patterning, mechanisms of avian color vision, egg shape and structure, brood parasitism and coevolution, and visual ecology of hummingbirds. more
Professor Jochen Wolf works on Evolutionary and Ecological Genetics at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich. The research of his group aims to understand the microevolutionary processes and genetic mechanisms underlying species divergence. Using large-scale genetic approaches, as well as field-based experiments, they characterize genomic divergence across populations and (sub-)species and assess its relationship to phenotypic divergence. In addition, they engage in comparative approaches to study evolution across larger timescales. more
Go to Editor View