Publikationen des MPIO

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Zeitschriftenartikel (57)

  1. 1.
    Dorado-Correa, A. M.; Zollinger, S. A.; Brumm, H.: Vocal plasticity in mallards: Multiple signal changes in noise and the evolution of the Lombard effect in birds. Journal of Avian Biology 49 (1), jav.01564 (2018)
  2. 2.
    Goymann, W.; Brumm, H.: Let’s talk about sex - Not gender. Bioessays 40 (5), 1800030 (2018)
  3. 3.
    Brumm, H.; Goymann, W.: On the natural history of duetting in White-browed Coucals: Sex- and body-size-dependent differences in a collective vocal display. Journal of Ornithology 158 (3), S. 669 - 678 (2017)
  4. 4.
    Brumm, H.; Zollinger, S. A.: Vocal plasticity in a reptile. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 284 (1855), 20170451 (2017)
  5. 5.
    Brumm, H.; Zollinger, S. A.; Niemelä, P. T.; Sprau, P.: Measurement artefacts lead to false positives in the study of birdsong in noise. Methods in Ecology and Evolution 8 (11), S. 1617 - 1625 (2017)
  6. 6.
    Hardman, S. I.; Zollinger, S. A.; Koselj, K.; Leitner, S.; Marshall, R. C.; Brumm, H.: Lombard effect onset times reveal the speed of vocal plasticity in a songbird. The Journal of Experimental Biology 220 (6), S. 1065 - 1071 (2017)
  7. 7.
    Zollinger, S. A.; Slater, P. J. B.; Nemeth, E.; Brumm, H.: Higher songs of city birds may not be an individual response to noise. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 284 (1860), 20170602 (2017)
  8. 8.
    Brumm, H.; Bee, M.: A meta-analytic castle built on sand? A comment on Roca et al. Behavioral Ecology 27 (5), S. 1277 - 1278 (2016)
  9. 9.
    Dominoni, D. M.; Greif, S.; Nemeth, E.; Brumm, H.: Airport noise predicts song timing of European birds. Ecology and Evolution 6 (17), S. 6151 - 6159 (2016)
  10. 10.
    Dorado-Correa, A. M.; Rodríguez-Rocha, M.; Brumm, H.: Anthropogenic noise, but not artificial light levels predicts song behaviour in an equatorial bird. Royal Society Open Science 3 (7), 160231 (2016)
  11. 11.
    Templeton, C. N.; Zollinger, S. A.; Brumm, H.: Traffic noise drowns out great tit alarm calls. Current Biology 26 (22), S. R1173 - R1174 (2016)
  12. 12.
    Elemans, C.P.H.; Rasmussen, J.H.; Herbst, C.T.; Düring, D.N.; Zollinger, S. A.; Brumm, H.; Srivastava, K.; Svane, N.; Ding, M.; Larsen, O.N. et al.; Sober, S.J.; Švec, J.G.: Universal mechanisms of sound production and control in birds and mammals. Nature Communications 6, 8978 (2015)
  13. 13.
    Luo, J.; Goerlitz, H. R.; Brumm, H.; Wiegrebe, L.: Linking the sender to the receiver: Vocal adjustments by bats to maintain signal detection in noise. Scientific Reports 5, 18556 (2015)
  14. 14.
    Zollinger, S. A.; Brumm, H.: Why birds sing loud songs and why they sometimes don't. Animal Behaviour 105, S. 289 - 295 (2015)
  15. 15.
    Brumm, H.: Fish struggle to be heard – but just how much fin waving is there? Behavioral Ecology 25 (5), S. 1033 - 1034 (2014)
  16. 16.
    Doolittle, E.; Brumm, H.: O Canto do Uirapuru: Consonant intervals and patterns in the song of the musician wren. Journal of Interdisciplinary Music Studies 6, S. 55 - 85 (2013)
  17. 17.
    Nemeth, E.; Pieretti, N.; Zollinger, S. A.; Geberzahn, N.; Partecke, J.; Miranda, A. C.; Brumm, H.: Bird song and anthropogenic noise: vocal constraints may explain why birds sing higher-frequency songs in cities. Proceedings of the Royal Society B: Biological Sciences 280 (1754), 20122798 (2013)
  18. 18.
    Brumm, H.: Biomusic and Popular Culture: The Use of Animal Sounds in the Music of the Beatles. Journal of Popular Music Studies 24 (1), S. 25 - 38 (2012)
  19. 19.
    Brumm, H.; Teschke, I.: Juvenile Galapagos pelicans increase their foraging success by copying adult behaviour. PLoS One 7 (12), e51881 (2012)
  20. 20.
    Nemeth, E.; Kempenaers, B.; Matessi, G.; Brumm, H.: Rock sparrow song reflects male age and reproductive success. PLoS One 7 (8), e43259 (2012)
  21. 21.
    Nemeth, E.; Zollinger, S. A.; Brumm, H.: Effect Sizes and the Integrative Understanding of Urban Bird Song (A Reply to Slabbekoorn et al.). American Naturalist 180 (1), S. 146 - 152 (2012)
  22. 22.
    Ritschard, M.; Brumm, H.: Zebra finch song reflects current food availability. Evolutionary Ecology 26 (4), S. 801 - 812 (2012)
  23. 23.
    Ritschard, M.; van Oers, K.; Naguib, M.; Brumm, H.: Song amplitude of rival males modulates the territorial behaviour of great tits during the fertile period of their mates. Ethology 118 (2), S. 197 - 202 (2012)
  24. 24.
    Schuster, S.; Zollinger, S. A.; Lesku, J. A.; Brumm, H.: On the evolution of noise-dependent vocal plasticity in birds. Biology Letters 8 (6), S. 913 - 916 (2012)
  25. 25.
    Zollinger, S. A.; Podos, J.; Nemeth, E.; Goller, F.; Brumm, H.: On the relationship between, and measurement of, amplitude and frequency in birdsong. Animal Behaviour 84 (4), S. E1 - E9 (2012)
  26. 26.
    Brumm, H.; Ritschard, M.: Song amplitude affects territorial aggression of male receivers in chaffinches. Behavioral Ecology 22 (2), S. 310 - 316 (2011)
  27. 27.
    Brumm, H.; Robertson, K. A.; Nemeth, E.: Singing direction as a tool to investigate the function of birdsong: an experiment on sedge warblers. Animal Behaviour 81 (3), S. 653 - 659 (2011)
  28. 28.
    Brumm, H.; Zollinger, S. A.: The evolution of the Lombard effect: 100 years of psychoacoustic research. Behaviour 148 (11-13), S. 1173 - 1198 (2011)
  29. 29.
    Ritschard, M.; Brumm, H.: Effects of vocal learning, phonetics and inheritance on song amplitude in zebra finches. Animal Behaviour 82 (6), S. 1415 - 1422 (2011)
  30. 30.
    Ritschard, M.; Laucht, S.; Dale, J.; Brumm, H.: Enhanced testosterone levels affect singing motivation but not song structure and amplitude in Bengalese finches. Physiology & Behavior 102 (1), S. 30 - 35 (2011)
  31. 31.
    Zollinger, S. A.; Brumm, H.: The Lombard effect. Current Biology 21 (16), S. R614 - R615 (2011)
  32. 32.
    Zollinger, S. A.; Goller, F.; Brumm, H.: Metabolic and respiratory costs of increasing song amplitude in zebra finches. PLoS One 6 (9), e23198 (2011)
  33. 33.
    Brumm, H.; Farrington, H.; Petren, K.; Fessl, B.: Evolutionary dead end in the Galapagos: Divergence of sexual signals in the rarest of Darwin's finches. PLoS One 5 (6), e11191 (2010)
  34. 34.
    Nemeth, E.; Brumm, H.: Birds and Anthropogenic Noise: Are Urban Songs Adaptive? American Naturalist 176 (4), S. 465 - 475 (2010)
  35. 35.
    Ritschard, M.; Riebel, K.; Brumm, H.: Female zebra finches prefer high-amplitude song. Animal Behaviour 79 (4), S. 877 - 883 (2010)
  36. 36.
    Brumm, H.: Song amplitude and body size in birds. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 63 (8), S. 1157 - 1165 (2009)
  37. 37.
    Brumm, H.; Lachlan, R. F.; Riebel, K.; Slater, P. J. B.: On the function of song type repertoires: testing the 'antiexhaustion hypothesis' in chaffinches. Animal Behaviour 77 (1), S. 37 - 42 (2009)
  38. 38.
    Brumm, H.; Schmidt, R.; Schrader, L.: Noise-dependent vocal plasticity in domestic fowl. Animal Behaviour 78 (3), S. 741 - 746 (2009)
  39. 39.
    Brumm, H.; Zollinger, S. A.; Slater, P. J. B.: Developmental stress affects song learning but not song complexity and vocal amplitude in zebra finches. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 63 (9), S. 1387 - 1395 (2009)
  40. 40.
    Brumm, H.; Naguib, M.: Environmental acoustics and the evolution of bird song. Advances in the Study of Behavior, S. 1 - 33 (2009)
  41. 41.
    Nemeth, E.; Brumm, H.: Blackbirds sing higher-pitched songs in cities: adaptation to habitat acoustics or side-effect of urbanization? Animal Behaviour 78 (3), S. 637 - 641 (2009)
  42. 42.
    Samarra, F. I. P.; Klappert, K.; Brumm, H.; Miller, P. J. O.: Background noise constrains communication: acoustic masking of courtship song in the fruit fly Drosophila montana. Behaviour 146 (12), S. 1635 - 1648 (2009)
  43. 43.
    Brumm, H.; Slater, P. J. B.: Animal communication: timing counts. Current Biology 17 (13), S. R521 - R523 (2007)
  44. 44.
    Brumm, H.: Signalling through acoustic windows: nightingales avoid interspecific competition by short-term adjustment of song timing. Journal of Comparative Physiology A-Neuroethology Sensory Neural and Behavioral Physiology 192, S. 1279 - 1285 (2006)
  45. 45.
    Brumm, H.; Slater, P. J. B.: Animals can vary signal amplitude with receiver distance: evidence from zebra finch song. Animal Behaviour 72 (3), S. 699 - 705 (2006)
  46. 46.
    Brumm, H.; Slater, P. J. B.: Ambient noise, motor fatigue and serial redundancy in chaffinch song. Behavioral Ecology and Sociobiology 60 (4), S. 475 - 481 (2006)
  47. 47.
    Brumm, H.: Animal Communication: City birds have changed their tune. Current Biology 16 (23), S. R1003 - R1004 (2006)
  48. 48.
    Brumm, H.; Slabbekoorn, H.: Acoustic communication in noise. Advances in the Study of Behavior 35, S. 151 - 209 (2005)
  49. 49.
    Brumm, H.; Kipper, S.; Riechelmann, C.; Todt, D.: Do Barbary macaques 'comment' on what they see? A first report on vocalizations accompanying interactions of third parties. Primates 46 (2), S. 141 - 144 (2005)
  50. 50.
    Brumm, H.: The impact of environmental noise on song amplitude in a territorial bird. Journal of Animal Ecology 73 (3), S. 434 - 440 (2004)
 
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