Contact

Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Goymann
Prof. Dr. Wolfgang Goymann
Research Scientist
Phone: +49 8157 932-301
Room: Seewiesen

Team members

Monika Trappschuh
Technical Assistant
Phone: +49 8157 932-270
Room: Seewiesen
Ignas Safari Mng'anya
Ignas Safari Mng'anya
IMPRS Doctoral Student
Room: Seewiesen

Working with me

I welcome post-docs, who are willing to develop collaborative research proposals (e.g. applications for Marie Sklokowska-Curie fellowships) in topics related to the ecophysiology of life histories.

Postdocs wanted

I welcome post-docs, who are willing to develop collaborative research proposals (e.g. applications for Marie Sklokowska-Curie fellowships) in topics related to the ecophysiology of life histories.

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Physiological ecology of life histories

Wolfgang Goymann

The world consists of many different and diverse environments (or biomes). Some of these biomes are characterized by little annual fluctuations in environmental conditions such as temperature, rainfall, or food abundance (e.g. tropical moist broadleaf forests). Others show large, but highly predictable annual fluctuations in environmental conditions (e.g. temperate broadleaf or mixed forests), and there are also biomes with large and highly unpredictable fluctuations of environmental parameters (e.g. many deserts and xeric scrublands).

To survive and successfully reproduce, an animal’s morphology, physiology and behaviour needs to be tuned to these environmental conditions. As a consequence animals have evolved myriads of character traits and adopted various life-history strategies to cope with the challenges posed by their environment.

Knowing the physiological underpinnings of life histories and the flexibility of physiological control systems to environmental change are key to understanding the impact of human-induced global change on different animal species and populations. With this knowledge we can predict which species may be more likely to suffer from human-induced change.

We are interested in the interplay between physiology, behaviour and ecology of animals and how different environments and life histories shape physiological control mechanisms of behaviour.

Current projects:

Which ecological, physiological and evolutionary factors drive the drastic differences in behaviour and life-history of these two closely related coucal species? To tackle these questions we study colour-ringed and radiotagged coucals in the Usangu Plains, Tanzania.

Ecophysiology and evolution of sex-roles – a comparison of black and white-browed coucals

Which ecological, physiological and evolutionary factors drive the drastic differences in behaviour and life-history of these two closely related coucal species? To tackle these questions we study colour-ringed and radiotagged coucals in the Usangu Plains, Tanzania.

[more]
The sex hormone testosterone has been traditionally linked to aggressive behaviour, not only in humans but also in other animals. In birds, testosterone is involved in regulating aggressive behaviour during the breeding season. But the black redstart is different...

Territorial aggression and testosterone levels in black redstarts

The sex hormone testosterone has been traditionally linked to aggressive behaviour, not only in humans but also in other animals. In birds, testosterone is involved in regulating aggressive behaviour during the breeding season. But the black redstart is different...

[more]
Individual birds show huge differences in the concentration of hormones such as testosterone or corticosterone. Which environmental, social and intrinsic factors drive these huge differences in hormone levels? And how do these differences affect survival, health, fecundity, and reproductive success of individuals?

Life history and hormones - Why are hormone levels so different between and within individuals and species?

Individual birds show huge differences in the concentration of hormones such as testosterone or corticosterone. Which environmental, social and intrinsic factors drive these huge differences in hormone levels? And how do these differences affect survival, health, fecundity, and reproductive success of individuals?

[more]
Bird migration requires drastic changes in behaviour and physiology, but the physiological mechanisms that underlie these transitions are largely unexplored. We study the physiology of stop-over behaviour of migratory songbirds on Ponza, an island in the Mediterranean Sea.

Ecophysiology of bird migration and stop-over behaviour

Bird migration requires drastic changes in behaviour and physiology, but the physiological mechanisms that underlie these transitions are largely unexplored.
We study the physiology of stop-over behaviour of migratory songbirds on Ponza, an island in the Mediterranean Sea.

[more]
 
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